Maritime Association
of the Port of
New York
and
New Jersey

Seventh Annual International Maritime Hall of Fame Awards

Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000

Malcom McLean and George F. Lowman receive special honors at the International Maritime Hall of Fame Awards

Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999

Third Annual High Speed Ferry Conference

Year 2000 Maritime Issues Conference





















 

 

 

 



Maritime Association of the Port of
New York and New Jersey

• Int'l Maritime Hall of Fame Awards • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000 • Malcom McLean — Man of the Century • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999 • High Speed Ferry Conference • Y2K Maritime Issues Conference


Malcom McLean, Man of the Century, Founder of Container Shipping, George F. Lowman, Chairman of Farrell Lines, Inc., World Humanitarian,
Were Honored at International Maritime Hall of Fame at UN, May 12

Malcom McLean, Man of the Century, the founder of container shipping, along with six other maritime leaders, was honored at The International Maritime Hall of Fame on May 12, 1999, sponsored by The Maritime Association of the Port of New York/New Jersey. The honors were presented at the United Nations in New York City.

Honored at this annual event are individuals and organizations which have benefited the maritime industry with technological advancements, superior quality of service, outstanding foresighted leadership, and unique individual achievements which have been recognized worldwide.

1999 inductees for the International Maritime Hall of Fame were Malcom P. McLean, founder of container shipping; George F. Lowman, Chairman of Farrell Lines, Inc., recipient of the first-ever World Humanitarian Award; Professor Francesco Berlingieri, President, Comité Maritime International in Genoa, Italy; Richard "Skip" Hayward, Vice Chairman, Mashantucket Pequot Nation's Tribal Council and Chairman, Pequot River Shipworks; ADM Robert E. Kramek, President, ABS, Americas; Guy E.C. Clay Maitland, Principal, International Registries, Inc.; and Patricia Martin, Director, Department of the Department of Consular and Maritime Affairs for the Republic of Panama.

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Malcom P. McLean - Man Of The Century

Malcom P. McLean is the Man of the Century. Forbes Magazine described the acclaimed founder of container shipping as "one of the few men who changed the world."

In 1934 Malcom McLean founded McLean Trucking Company which became one of the nation's largest trucking firms. In 1955 the trucking company was divested to establish McLean Industries, Inc.

In 1955 Malcom McLean used his own resources and introduced the concept of container shipping through Sea-Land Service which then became the world's largest shipping company. Sea-Land was sold to R.J. Reynolds in 1969. By 1985, he built U.S. Lines into the world's largest container shipping company. And in 1992, he started Trailer Bridge, Inc., the world's first company to build vessels exclusively for 53 foot containers. Mr. McLean is the sole individual, according to New York Stock Exchange officials, to found five public companies, three of which are listed on the NYSE.

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George Lowman Honored as World Humanitarian

The recipient of the first-ever World Humanitarian Award given at the International Maritime Hall of Fame by the Maritime Association of the Port of New York & New Jersey was George F. Lowman, Chairman of Farrell Lines, Inc.

With utmost and consistent generosity, George Lowman makes vessels and containers available along with expert carriage and delivery of goods when people of the world need food, medical supplies and emergency shelters. Farrell Lines, Inc., chaired by Mr. Lowman, has magnanimously opened its entire fleet to meet the world's humanitarian needs. Led by George Lowman, Farrell Lines is available for emergency relief supplies and is active on Africa's east and west coasts in addition to major runs in the Black, Adriatic, and Mediterranean Seas. For tremendous contributions and deeds, Mr. Lowman is graciously honored by the maritime industry in the area of shipping.

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Other Honored Awardees

ADM Robert E. Kramek, as Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, reorganized the Coast Guard, improved its service to the American public, and enhanced its reputation as Guardian of the Sea. Presently retired from the Coast Guard, he is President of ABS Americas, a division of the American Bureau of Shipping Companies.

Guy E.C. Maitland, as a principal of International Registries, Inc., administers the Liberian and Marshall Islands vessel and corporate registries, and is a managing member of Dunoon, LLC. He co-founded The Admiralty/Finance Forum and was a major role player in the bareboat registration provisions of the 1993 International Convention on Maritime Liens and Mortgages. He is an officer of The Shipping News, Inc., an Internet maritime data and information provider, focusing on ship registration and mortgage law, and vessel finance in general. Additionally, his personal generosity has fostered and perpetuated numerous maritime endeavors.

Richard "Skip" Hayward is Vice Chairman of the Mashantucket Pequot Nation's Tribal Council and Chairman of the Pequot River Shipworks. He is especially recognized for his leadership in the resurgence of American shipbuilding with new technologies, having introduced high speed ferry service in the northeastern United States. Furthermore, he established a shipbuilding company in New London, Connecticut.

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Professor Francesco Berlingieri, President, Comité Maritime International, Genoa, Italy, developed uniform international law in shipping and international trade through IMO, UNCTD and UNCITRAL. An eminent international maritime lawyer of Europe, he has had a great influence on the shipping and maritime law in many areas.

Patricia Martin, Director of the Department of Consular and Maritime Affairs for the Republic of Panama, directs the New York Representative Office, SEGUMAR, providing safety and technical matters to shipowners registered under the Panamanian flag. Formerly she was a liaison with European shipowners and agencies in Piraeus, Greece. She has approved vessel plans, installation of refrigeration system designs, hydrostatic and electric generator installations.

The International Maritime Hall of Fame made its debut as an annual event in 1993 and will continue to honor great contributors to the maritime industry into the third millennium through the proud sponsorship of The Maritime Association of the Port of New York and New Jersey.

• Int'l Maritime Hall of Fame Awards • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000 • Malcom McLean — Man of the Century • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999 • High Speed Ferry Conference • Y2K Maritime Issues Conference

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• Int'l Maritime Hall of Fame Awards • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000 • Malcom McLean — Man of the Century • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999 • High Speed Ferry Conference • Y2K Maritime Issues Conference
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Comments on February 16-17, 1999 Harbor Safety Committees of 21st Century National Conference
— held at Windows on the World, One World Trade Center, New York City
March 5, 1999



Suggestions for Next Steps:
1. Educate general public as to the importance of a safe and economically viable harbor and port system throughout the country.
2. Secure funding for new systems and research into AIS, etc.
3. Educate recreational boater about dangers, proper safety procedures in harbor areas.
4. Need a vehicle for "Lessons Learned."
5. All Harbor Safety Committees need permanent ... source(s) of funding for administrative support.
6. HSCs have an educational role which has yet to be exploited. The general population is unaware of importance of marine commerce or knows only about the system's problems. HSCs can encourage publicity to improve understanding of benefits, needs.
7. Need a vehicle to provide information about
mega-trends to help HSCs think ahead.
8. Need to address how to develop HSC in smaller ports.
9. Have goals established; e.g., Impact of Advisory Board Law, plan of action to address problems, if any.
10. Discuss inter-relationship with other groups:area committee, security-crime terrorism.
11. Involve political side (get a Senator and
Governor to speak).
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12. Format of conference should not be presentation of papers/panels, but instead the attendees should be broken into working groups and work on issues and come up with national recommendations. This present format is good for exchange of "This is how we do it" but doesn't capture what makes HSCs work, what will make them better.
13. Next year host in Washington DC and invite a number of key Congressmen/Senators who could support with funding.
14. Press release inviting major nationwide publications.
15. Attendance needs to mirror makeup of local committees - more local/state representatives, all federal agencies, ACOE district reps, terminal operators, etc.
16. Broad based recreational port users should participate, not just yacht owners but PWC organizations (if existing), kayakers, etc. They are homogeneous and need representation to convey perspectives. Same applies to non-governmental groups with environmental interests. Can those above be induced to attend by offering conference for free to non-profits?
17. Harbor Safety Committees need a clearing house for information (website?) to share ideas and successes. This was discussed and should be done as soon as possible.
18. The chairmanship and management of Harbor Safety Committees should be rotated annually among participating entities to share responsibility and ensure commitment.


• Int'l Maritime Hall of Fame Awards • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000 • Malcom McLean — Man of the Century • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999 • High Speed Ferry Conference • Y2K Maritime Issues Conference

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Harbor Safety Committees of the 21st Century Wrap-Up Summary February 16-17, 1999
Recorder: Judy Rovins

Lillian Borrone, Director, Port Commerce, Port Authority of New York &New Jersey, chaired the Harbor Safety Committees of the 21st Century Conference wrap-up. She commented that she had seen the harbor environment change, had seen people's attitudes about the harbor change. Borrone advocated that "Diversity is a strength!"

She asked the panelists

1. to comment on what they would like to see achieved in the next year on issues of philosophy and mechanisms for progress on harbor safety committees.
2. to give suggestions on communication and cooperation at the national level with the spectrum of federal agencies, local and regional entities.
3. what kind of information the panelists are interested in focusing on during the next year; what mechanisms are recommended for communication and for a clearinghouse effort.
4. to comment for the Marine Board in California on how we can utilize risk assessment and use it in an HSC.
5. to comment on how the US Coast Guard can provide support.

Lillian Borrone asked the audience to help pull together a national legislative agenda.

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Andy McGovern, Sandy Hook Pilots, mentioned the misunderstanding with foreign ports about environmental regulations. He asked that minutes of HSCs be posted on the Internet. He pointed out that real-time information is needed for a port to maximize what it does have. HSCs need to address risk assessment.

Bill Gray, President, Gray Maritime Services, advocated:

1. Better hydrography information.
2. Internet activity for HSCs.
3. Memberships of outsiders from Marine Board, aviation industry for
..... a. Commonality of procedures from bridges of ships ..........and in the air.
......b. Near-miss policy
4. User fees
5. Liability should be shared.

6. Let's get criminality out of accidents.
7. Issue of liability of non-tankers .
8. Need members from environmental group.
9. We need to learn how to use AISs before we start telling others what to do.

Jack Sparks, President, American Pilots Association, advocated handling on a local level the issues of communication, liability, safety. He asked the audience to identify what they want the federal government to do. Captains of Ports should have HSCs at every port, should have partnerships with pilots.

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Linda O'Leary, Vice President, American Waterways Operators, asked that Harbor Safety Committees share their charters, offer a prototype of an HSC. In the implementation of a port information network, she suggests the HSC address what the users want: VTS, AIS information. Linda O'Leary and Andy McGovern are requesting State funding for disseminating such information.

O'Leary requested limitation of liability for an information provider.

We need to get recreational and environmental groups to come participate in the process.

Root cause analysis should lead to "Where did the chain of error break down?"

Joe Cox, President, Chamber of Shipping of America, called himself an observer of the harbor safety committee process. Representing shipowners, both foreign and domestic, he indicated that he should not be a member of the committee at the local level. Cox raised the question about how and why harbor safety committees work. Why are those people at the table?

Port viability, for example, in the underkeel clearance issue, does make for cooperation.

Do not rely on the vagaries of personnel changes and federal changes.

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RADM Robert C. North in the Harbor Safety Committees of the 21st Century Conference wrap-up repeated his opening keynote challenges.

First Challenge:
Consider principles of operation for the function of HSCs..
Second Challenge:
Propose an optimal means of external communication between HSCs and Marine Transportation Users as well as with national level stakeholders.
Third Challenge:
Export your success stories and lessons learned.
Fourth Challenge:
Determine how the collective federal agencies of the MTS initiative can help HSCs. Consider legislation and resource.

1. Focus on safety of traffic, keep an eye on the facilitation side; do not create problems for facilitation. Safe traffic is a priority. Think about environmental protection.
2. Act as a clearinghouse, a sounding board; bring all players to the table, including foreign flags, fishing community, environmental protection interests.
3. We do not need a federal mandate for local coordination.
4. Advertise in the federal register; ask who wants to serve on harbor safety committees.
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5. The Captains of the Port should write invitation letters to prospective committee members to determine interest in serving; broaden HSCs to a wide cross section of stakeholders on the committees.
6. US Coast Guard HQ should develop a navigational inspection circular.
7.
A unified command should not be applied to Harbor Safety Committees.
8. A unified command approach is a way to organize federal agencies around an issue of spill response, for example; but our issue is working the harbor.
9. Communications are important for the mariner, both inter and intra communications.
10. Communications on harbor safety should rise to the national agenda, should be usable and easily accessed. Involve agencies of MARAD, NOAA, Army Corps of Engineers, and others.
11. Build leadership to bring consensus. As Jeff High indicated earlier in the conference, we should lead and coordinate among ourselves.
12. Prevention is the best response. The next round of prevention efforts is in our hands.
13. AIS is moving along well.
14. Get input to the Secretary of Transportation about the Harbor Safety Committees' progress.

Audience comment:
1. There is a COTP risk assessment guide which all in the room should read; and then there is the issue of risk management. We need to hear more on effective risk management. HSC conference attendees next week a copy of the conference evaluations, RADM North's opening paper, and a summary of the wrap-up panel's remarks.

• Int'l Maritime Hall of Fame Awards • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000 • Malcom McLean — Man of the Century • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999 • High Speed Ferry Conference • Y2K Maritime Issues Conference

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• Int'l Maritime Hall of Fame Awards • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000 • Malcom McLean — Man of the Century • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999 • High Speed Ferry Conference • Y2K Maritime Issues Conference
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High Speed Ferry Northeast
3rd Annual Conference

©1999 Illustration Kentucky Coast, LLC

Third Annual High Speed Ferry NE Conference Review Windows on the World, World Trade Center, New York City, April 8, 1999
By Judy Rovins, President, Motivators Conferences

Private and Public Development of High Speed Craft Underway for Next Century

Alan Olmsted, Director, Private Ferry Operations, New York City, moderated the one day High Speed Ferry NE Conference and Trade Show. His opening introduction of Robert Grotell, Director of Transportation, New York City Mayor's Office, set the stage for Olmstead's recognition that traffic is shifting to the waterways. More specifically, New York City is expanding its role as a center of the high speed ferry.

"Today there are more high speed craft in and around New York City than in prior years. The renaissance of ferries linking the region has increased every year since 1986," said Olmsted. Short and middle distance routes are popular now.

A number of projects in private and public development are underway for the next century, including public dollars for the Whitehall Tunnel and the St. George Tunnel. A new Pier 11 is under construction including a new terminal, coffee shop, public art space, garden and pickup on South Street for taxis and buses. Other projects include entry into the Hudson River and into midway Manhattan, a ferry terminal on 34th Street, permanent facilities on East 62nd Street, East 75th Street and East 90th Street.

The ferry landing at Yankee Stadium has five ferry boats on the average unload for a game. The Battery Park City Terminal with funding of $30 million will expand passenger comfort. Weehawken will see New Jersey light rail.


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Jim Peachey, BOMEL Limited, UK
"Risks to Passengers and Crew in High Speed Ferry Higher Than Previous Experience Indicated"

A formal assessment developed by the IMO compares risks with risk criteria to determine what is expected from high speed craft in relation to accidents. Risks, costs and options should be part of the decision-making for safety. The Maritime Coast Guard Agency-UK Maritime Administration chose high speed ferries for the safety assessment because of the new technologies being introduced worldwide.IMO did not consider environmental, business or property risks. Collision was noted as a priority - high speed craft are in confined waters. Fire risk is significant. There is a degree of uncertainty about the hull integrity.

IMO looked for factors which influence and cause risk levels to be high: 1) training, 2) management, 3) human element, 4) design of the craft, 5) communications, 6) maintenance. Many accidents happen at low speed - berthing. Approximately 86% of accidents are due to human error. Factors considered were reliability of hardware systems, personal performance of bridge staff, commercial drivers. Seventy-eight individual risk control measures which were identified addressed accident scenarios and their causes. Those then were grouped into 24 potential regulatory options.

The conclusion was that risks to passengers and crew in high speed ferries are higher than previous experience indicated.

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Claude McKernan, Operations Manger, NY Waterway
"Safety Through Risk ID and Management"

A high speed craft is a pollution reducer, a stress reducer and a travel improver. "Today there is a shift away from highways into terminals," stated McKernan. Federal funds are available for the construction of intermodal connections to reduce risk.

Human error is responsible for most of the marine accidents. Operators of faster craft follow industry standards, not government regulations. Fire drills and man overboard drills were the training in years past. Now there is new additional training for operators of craft in excess of 28 knots. McKernan advocates more proactive steps to develop and implement higher standards of safety, communications protocols, as well as in the in-house training for operators of high speed ferries. The external operating controls of AIS and VTS are structured with only the highest speed vessels, but should be a part of the in-house training. McKernan urged the various levels of government to facilitate and expand high speed ferry travel. The future must include the establishment of best practices for operating fast craft.

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Peter Duclos, President, Gladding-Hearn Shipbuilding
"Entry Into Fast Ferry -What's New? What's in the Future?"

The fast ferries highlight twin hull, narrow hulls; are well-rounded and suited for many applications. Designed to meet the High Speed Craft Code, the fast craft uses a variety of propulsion systems. The good water propeller propulsion is 70 percent efficient. The jet propulsion is 60 percent efficient and heavier. The water jet is tolerable to the water break and highly maneuverable. Peter Duclos' dynamic visual presentation featured many new high speed ferries operating in the Northeast.

LCDR Joseph Duffy, USCG - Boston
"Risk Management and Operational Safety Issues"

Sole reliance and dependency on radar seem to be the practice for High Speed Craft. Are all operators of high speed craft trained on the radar for accuracy?

LCDR Duffy generated questions from the audience when he presented visual on the Flarecraft which plans to be operational in six months from New London, Connecticut to Long Island. The vessels will travel at 95-100 knots, have four passengers and can travel at 300 foot heights.

Gene Guest, Director, Marine Safety International
"Simulator Systems for High Speed Ferries"

We need to change our thinking about training for high speed ferries and need to consider why a simulator would be beneficial in training. First, high speed ferries are different from other vessels in their construction materials, composites, water jets, and they are different in power to weight ratio. The high speed craft are fast and slow, and according to IMO Code, operators need type training, not just general training.

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Since training on a dedicated particular craft would be expensive, training on a simulator of a high speed craft is cheaper, faster and better.

Technical requirements of a simulator for high speed ferries include:
......1) specific bridge equipment,
..... 2) a new mathematical model,
..... 3) higher visual update rate,
..... 4) faster computer iteration than on a conventional .........simulator, and
..... 5) a need for 3-D visuals.

Training programs on a simulator for high speed ferries are intended to be rigorous practice for the operators to learn proficiency. Training is intended to be a regular program and should be given both to replacement crew and current crew for renewal purposes. The High Speed Craft Code in IMO advocates recurrent training every two years for High Speed Craft operators.

A cost-effective simulator had modular construction to change layout, instrumentation and controls. The simulator should have mobile capability - HSC bridge simulator, ARPA, ECDIS, engine monitoring station, and a night vision station. A simulated bridge could be put in a trailer for instruction and used for observation by the instructor.

Jim Rienhardt, Gateway National Parks, Chairman "Public-Private Partnerships and Development Opportunities" was the closing panel to encourage such opportunities in the Gateway National Parks.

• Int'l Maritime Hall of Fame Awards • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000 • Malcom McLean — Man of the Century • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999 • High Speed Ferry Conference • Y2K Maritime Issues Conference

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• Int'l Maritime Hall of Fame Awards • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000 • Malcom McLean — Man of the Century • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999 • High Speed Ferry Conference • Y2K Maritime Issues Conference
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Year 2000 Maritime Issues Conference in New York City, February 23-24, 1998
Media Coverage by Marine News, March 26, 1998

Y2K poses a host of obstacles for the commercial marine industry

Impact of the potential worldwide computer problem
on the commercial maritime industry

The Maritime Association of the Port of New York & New Jersey, in cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, sponsored The Year 2000 Maritime Issues Conference on February 23-24, 1998 in New York City. The event was organized by The Motivators-JK Rovins Associates LLC.

Among the distinguished speakers were
...Thomas Falvey, Assoc. Director, National Security,
..... Office-Secretary of Transportation;
...Professor Dick Lefkon, New York University;
...Scott Withee, Manager, Allocations,
..... Mobil Shipping & Transportation Company;
...Eugene F. Taylor, Jr., Director, Information ......Resource Management, Office of the Chief ......Information Officer, US Department of ......Transportation;
...Howard S. Kossoy, Vice President,
..... Millenium Development, SCI.

Rear Admiral George N. Naccara, Director, Information and Technology for the US Coast Guard and Captain Thomas H. Gilmour, Director, Field Activities, Marine Safety & Environmental Protection at US Coast Guard Headquarters gave opening addresses.

Nick Cretan, Executive Director of the Maritime Association of the Port of New York & New Jersey, noted that shipboard computer failures could give rise to some very serious problems. He cited a British technical journal which recently warned that the failure of microchips and software could mean that satellite position control systems may indicate incorrect positions or none at all; onboard electronic mapping systems may display incorrect sea surface charts; automatic control systems may lock up; and vessels' power plants could shut down. The problem list also included engine vibration monitors, cargo loading software and global maritime distress and safety system equipment.

• Int'l Maritime Hall of Fame Awards • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000 • Malcom McLean — Man of the Century • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999 • High Speed Ferry Conference • Y2K Maritime Issues Conference

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7th Annual International Maritime
Hall of Fame Awards
United Nations Delegates Dining Room

Above the East River in New York City with a backdrop of spectacular bolts of lightning and heavy rainstorms, an audience of 240 persons in the United Nations Delegates' Dining Room watched the Year 2000 honorees inducted into the Seventh Annual International Maritime Hall of Fame on the evening of May 10.

The Maritime Association of the Port of New York & New Jersey is the sponsor of the International Maritime Hall of Fame. Funds raised for that evening continue the educational events and publications to support the Maritime Association's mission -- to promote the maritime industry.

Private guided tours of the United Nations preceded the reception and dinner. Nick Cretan, Executive Director, Maritime Association of the Port of New York & New Jersey, welcomed the audience, and the Rev. Jean Smith, offered the invocation

Ole Skaarup, Chairman of the Skaarup Group, was exceptionally humorous in his role as Emcee for the evening. The induction of the five honorees brought praises and roasts from the presenters. The inductees and their presenters are listed below.

John Bowers
President, International Longshoremen's Association, AFL-CIO
Presenter: Carmine F. Ragucci
President, CEO, Howland Hook Container Terminal, Inc.

Dr. Charles R. Cushing
President,C.R. Cushing & Co., Inc.
Presenter: James T. Shirley, Jr.,
Partner, Haight Gardner Holland & Knight

Christos N. Kritikos
President, Ceres Terminals Inc.
Presenter: Tetsufumi Otsuki
President, NYK Line (NA)

George H. Hearn
Former Executive Vice President
Waterman Steamship Corporation
Presenter: Guy E.C. Maitland Executive
Vice President, International Registries, Inc.

David A. Howard
Founder, American Shipper
Presenter: R.K. Johns
Chairman, R.K. Johns & Associates, Inc.

Pianist: Rolf Barnes
Photographer: Frank Duffy Event
Producer: Motivators-JK Rovins LLC

 

• Int'l Maritime Hall of Fame Awards • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 2000 • Malcom McLean — Man of the Century • Harbor Safety Commitee Recap 1999 • High Speed Ferry Conference • Y2K Maritime Issues Conference

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